Tag: The Dark Knight Rises

Working with a grumpy killer whale was terrifying

Working with a grumpy killer whale was terrifying

from Metro News (UK) / by Lesley O Toole

Marion Cotillard, 37, has won an Oscar, slept with Batman and was Bafta-nominated for playing a killer-whale trainer in her latest film, Rust And Bone

You’ve made huge Hollywood films such as Inception and The Dark Knight Rises. What was it about this smaller French film?
It was one of my dreams to work with the director Jacques Audiard [of A Prophet, Oscar-nominated as Best Foreign Film in 2010]. Then I totally fell in love with the character. You don’t read many interesting powerful female roles like this, especially one with a very unusual story.

There’s a harrowing scene where a little boy falls through the ice. Was that difficult to watch, as a mother of one?
Oh yeah. Unbearable. When I first read the script, I was weeping at the end. But it’s a beautiful tale.

Did you ever play on the ice as a kid?
No. It’s super-dangerous. I remember a scene like that in the film The Four Daughters Of Doctor March, I think. And I’ve always been so scared. I’ve always freaked out. I never did that and I will never allow my children to do that.

Your character, Stephanie, loses her legs. What are your thoughts on that?
This is something unbearable and really hard to imagine how it feels. It’s something we refuse to see because if it was us, how would you do? Nobody likes to confront their fears.

There’s an incredible scene where you communicate with an orca through a glass. How was that?
On the first day, my signs to the orca weren’t very precise and she didn’t get what I was asking her. I asked her again and she got mad at me. She screamed, and that was really weird. Even though it was super-secure and nothing could happen to me, I was in a state of shock. This was the biggest mouth ever, the biggest jaws ever and it was right in front of my face. The teeth were so scary. I was in shock. I cried right away. So we changed the orca for the shot.

There are also some quite explicit sex scenes…
I’ve never liked filming them as I don’t feel comfortable. But this story was different. The sex is a big part of the story. It’s a movie about love but also about flesh, about the body.

You won an Oscar as Best Actress for playing Edith Piaf in La Vie En Rose. Do you still get excited when you are nominated for awards?
It’s always exciting but nothing will ever be like my experience on La Vie En Rose because I didn’t expect anything that happened. I’m always happy if people like what we do. With La Vie En Rose, everything was new and I didn’t even know it was possible with a French movie.

You were out in London recently with Bradley Cooper, Ben Affleck and George Clooney. The tough part of awards season?
Yes. That’s the very good side of it. They’re very funny, very smart and very nice.

Is it true though that you have a weakness instead for Will Ferrell and Steve Carell and silly US comedies?
I totally love those guys too but that night was a lot of fun.

What are your top comedies?
Blades Of Glory and Stepbrothers.

How about Wedding Crashers, with pre-famous Bradley Cooper?
That was him? I totally forgot it was him. Oh my God. He’s the one who’s supposed to marry Rachel McAdams. I remember now.

Have you told your agents what they need to find you?
That’s not the way I work. But maybe. Because I’ve done so many dramas. I would love it to work that way. I think I still have a lot of work to do before a good silly comedy comes my way.

What performance has blown you away this year?
Naomi Watts in The Impossible. Oh my God, prepare your tissue box. I didn’t know anything about the movie except it was about the tsunami. She totally killed me. And I’m totally in love with Jennifer Lawrence. She’s a prodigy. She’s 22, it’s insane.

You were named Harvard University’s Woman Of The Year and roasted by the students. How was that?
One of the craziest things. It was a journey with amazing people so in love with their university.

What did they tease you about?
Things they didn’t like. They teased me about my very bad acting in some of the movies I’ve done and it was kind of a relief to be able to laugh about it. They teased me about The Dark Knight Rises. It was amazing because, especially in France, you don’t get to make fun of yourself. But I love to be able to talk about things that you’d like to forget.

Rust And Bone is out February 25 on DVD and Blu-ray

BAFTA Nomination!

The British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA) has just announced their nominees. Marion Cotillard & ‘Rust and Bone‘ as well as ‘The Dark Knight Rises‘ got nominated. Congratulations!!

FILM NOT IN THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE
Amour
Headhunters
The Hunt
Rust and Bone
Untouchable

LEADING ACTRESS
Emmanuelle Riva – Amour
Helen Mirren – Hitchcock
Jennifer Lawrence – Silver Linings Playbook
Jessica Chastain – Zero Dark Thirty
Marion Cotillard – Rust and Bone

SPECIAL VISUAL EFFECTS
The Dark Knight Rises
The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey
Life Of Pi
Marvel Avengers Assemble
Prometheus

The 2013 EE British Academy Film Awards will take place on Sunday 10 February at London’s Royal Opera House.

'The Dark Knight Rises' Blu-ray Screencaptures & Stills

The Dark Knight Rises‘ was released on DVD and Blu-ray end of November/early December in most places. I have finally added high quality Blu-ray screencaptures of Marion Cotillard to the gallery. Thanks to Red Rose we also have new stills & on set pictures. Enjoy!

Gallery:
331 The Dark Knight Rises – 2012 > Blu-ray Screencaptures
009 The Dark Knight Rises – 2012 > Stills
003 The Dark Knight Rises – 2012 > On Set

The Argument: Marion Cotillard, Hollywood’s favourite French actress, gets unleashed in Rust and Bone

The Argument: Marion Cotillard, Hollywood’s favourite French actress, gets unleashed in Rust and Bone

The first time I saw Marion Cotillard in the flesh was at this year’s TIFF. The jaw-droppingly gorgeous French actress was standing atop a long flight of stairs inside Michael’s on Simcoe. She was in town for the gala presentation of Rust and Bone, a dark and visceral French romance adapted from a collection of short stories by Toronto author Craig Davidson and directed by Jacques Audriard. In the film, she plays a killer whale trainer at Marineland who loses her legs in a freak accident involving an aquatic animal routine gone very, very wrong.

I happened to be coming up the stairs at Michael’s just as Cotillard, wearing bright blue and yellow satin heels, was about to go down. I saw the shoes before I saw the woman wearing them, and was about to compliment her when our eyes met, and I realized I was standing there with my one and only celebrity crush. I instantly froze. And then turned into a pile of mush.

Don’t get me wrong. I’m not obsessed with Cotillard in a creepy stalker way—not like the New York woman who recently pleaded guilty to sending the actress more than 500 emails, plus over 100 web videos of her (the stalker, not Cotillard) hissing like a cat and talking about playing Russian roulette. My crush is much more innocuous. It started nearly a decade ago when I saw her in the dark French comedy Jeux d’enfants, in which she plays a fiery woman who falls for her handsome best friend, played by the heartthrob (and Cotillard’s real-life partner) Guillaume Canet. She had me at bonjour.

With Rust and Bone, which hits theatres this month, Cotillard is an early contender for a Best Actress Oscar. She’s already won the big prize once, for her depiction of Édith Piaf in 2007’s La Vie en rose, which captured the conflicted chanteuse’s messy, selfish and tragic existence with an irrepressible intensity and almost eerie realism. She’s only the third French actress to take home the award—after Claudette Colbert, for 1934’s It Happened One Night, and Simone Signoret, for 1959’s Room at the Top—and the first to win for a French-language performance.

At the time, she could barely speak enough English to cobble together an acceptance speech, offering little more than a string of bumbled clichés and stunned thank yous. Five years later, she’s the public face of Rust and Bone for the film’s North American tour. At the TIFF screening, she deftly translated Audiard’s opening remarks, charming the capacity crowd.

Cotillard has come a long way in such a short time, and not just linguistically. Her post-Piaf resumé is a catalogue of big-name Hollywood directors—Michael Mann, Rob Marshall, Woody Allen, Steven Soderbergh. Not to mention her most high-profile role to date, as Bruce Wayne’s mysterious romantic interest in The Dark Knight Rises, for which director Christopher Nolan adjusted the shooting schedule purely to accommodate Cotillard, who was pregnant with her first child.

And yet Hollywood doesn’t quite know what to do with her. In the European films where I like her best, Cotillard is often cast as powerful, complicated women—roles that allow her to contrast an inner turmoil with her serene outer beauty. On this continent, she still gets stuck playing the foil to more
magnificent men.

We got a taste of Cotillard unleashed in Nolan’s Inception, in which she played Leo­nardo DiCaprio’s dead wife, who haunts his dreams with ever-greater maliciousness. Every move she makes in the film insinuates violence, every facial expression is a threat. She channels that same intensity in the musical Nine, in which she cuts down her philandering husband, played by Daniel Day-Lewis, with a sassy striptease. Both roles hint at Cotillard’s range, and yet neither captures her at her best.

Rust and Bone is the kind of character-driven drama that allows Cotillard to be raw, ragged and a little ferocious. After the grisly accident with the whale, Cotillard’s character awakens in a hospital room and slowly becomes aware that she’s a double-amputee. She screams and hurls herself from her bed to the floor, writhing in agony. Her pain is so palpable it makes you squirm in your seat. She is slowly restored by a friendship-cum-romance with a drifting street fighter and deadbeat dad (played with brute force by Belgian-born dreamboat Matthias Schoenaerts).

The role of a tragically disabled person who finds love and the will to survive sounds like shameless Oscar bait, but Cotillard makes the melodramatic scenario feel real. Her performance doesn’t come off as capital-A Acting—it’s as if you are witnessing someone’s most private moments. When she and Schoenaerts’ character finally have sex, the moment is entirely unsexy. She wants to know if she is still capable of engaging in intimate physical acts, and he, rather perfunctorily, obliges.

It’s the kind of scene that couldn’t happen in any of the blockbusting popcorn flicks that characterize her newfound Tinseltown career, but it’s one that shows exactly what she is capable of. There aren’t any bat-suited superheroes in Rust and Bone. What it does have is the real Marion—the one capable of reducing a man to nothing more than mush.

Interview: Marion Cotillard

Interview: Marion Cotillard

Oscar winner Marion Cotillard talks directors, CGI and why she’s suspicious of big studio movies

Marion Cotillard won an Oscar before she became a star.

The actor now familiar to Christopher Nolan fans as Mal in Inception and Miranda Tate in The Dark Knight Rises grabbed the Academy’s best actress prize for her full-throttle performance in La Vie En Rose (among a select few to do so for a foreign-language performance).

Having graduated to A-list status, Cotillard’s back in the Oscar conversation again, this time for her wrenching turn in Rust And Bone. She plays Stéphanie, an orca trainer who loses her legs in an accident and goes on to redefine her life, stripped of limbs, makeup and vanity.

During an interview at this year’s Toronto Film Festival, Cotillard shrugs off the physical challenge of playing an amputee. She credits CGI wizardry for that part of her performance. The bigger challenge was getting to know her character.

“Stéphanie was totally mysterious to me,” she says in gently accented English. When she told co-writer/director Jacques Audiard (A Prophet) that she didn’t understand her character, he claimed not to understand her either.

“So we took the road to meet her,” says Cotillard, recognizing that comfort with the enigmatic is part of Audiard’s genius. “I realized that part of Stéphanie would stay a mystery, and that’s okay.”

Cotillard stresses the importance of a solid director to lean on, whether in a French art house film or a big-budget extravaganza.

“The first person I do my job for is the director,” she says. Which is probably why her resumé is full of auteurs like Michael Mann, Steven Soderbergh and Woody Allen.

Dark Knight Rises director Nolan has “the spirit of an independent,” says Cotillard. He’s actively involved in every stage of the filmmaking process. On the other hand, she’s uneasy about studio movies – or at least those that seem so to her.

“One day I was offered a dream role in a huge, big American movie,” she says, explaining how her excitement for the project quickly evaporated when she met the director, who came off as a studio tool.

“I felt I had nothing to do in the project,” she says. “And he didn’t know anything about actors because it wasn’t his movie. It was a studio movie. He was there to direct. Direct what? I don’t know, but not me.”

She turned down the role (she won’t reveal the film’s title), even though friends called her crazy. When it turned out to be a massive box office success, Cotillard went to check out what she’d missed.

“It was so bad,” she says, laughing. “Even actors who were good in other movies were so bad [in this]. And I had the explanation: they had no director.” 

Oscar buzz

France entered The Intouchables as its entry in the foreign-language category, but don’t count out Marion Cotillard to score a best actress nod. Sure, she’s got an Oscar on her mantle already, but the Academy loves actors playing characters with disabilities.

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