Tag: Macbeth

Macbeth trailer finally released!

The trailer for Macbeth has finally been released! The film opened last month in Cannes to good reviews, including very good ones about Marion’s performance. This is exciting and the film looks beautiful from these images. Take a look:

I’m also working on gather everything I can from Cannes and posting it on the website to write a big post on Marion’s appearance in the festival this year. Still a lot to come.

New Macbeth Stills and project with Xavier Dolan

So many amazing news in one day! There are two new stills from Macbeth featuring Marion hat were released today. I have added them to the gallery so check them out! I have also added some new photoshoot outtakes.

In other news, Marion will be shooting a film next month directed by Xavier Dolan and co-starring Léa Seydoux, Gaspard Ulliel and Vincent Cassel. The film, Juste la Fin du Monde was announced today on the director’s twitter account and is reported to be shooting in May before he films another already mentioned project starring Jessica Chastain. I personally adore Xavier Dolan’s work so I cannot wait for this!

Read more about it here.

Gallery:
002 Movies > 2015 > Macbeth > Stills
002 Portraits > 2015 > Chopard
001 Portraits > 2015 > Madame Figaro
001 Portraits > 2014 > SNC

Macbeth opening in Cannes in May

Exciting news! The official selection for this year’s Cannes Film Festival was announced yesterday morning and Justin Kurzel’s Macbeth is on the official competition list. This means the film could win awards and that Marion will be on the race for best actress. This will surely mean we will see Marion Cotillard grace the festival again. This is the fourth year in a row that Marion has had a film competing at the Festival: Rust and Bone in 2012, The Immigrant in 2013 and Two Days, One Night in 2014.

You can check the official selection list here.

French Paradox

French Paradox

French actress Marion Cotillard is known for her exacting approach to Method acting but there was a time when she almost packed it all in, she tells Stephen Milton.

Towards the end of her Oscar speech, as she spluttered and nervously brushed her tumbling Veronica Lake curls behind her shoulder, Marion Cotillard made an earnest final statement of gratitude.

“Thank you life, thank you love,” she said, clutching the shiny statuette, a 
deserved accolade for her performance as Edith Piaf in La Vie En Rose.

“And it is true! There are some angels in this city.”

Cotillard [pronounced ko-tee-yar] is that rare anomaly: an A-list French actress who embraces Hollywood and all its vainglorious trappings.

Public Enemies, Inception, Nine, The Dark Knight Rises, Contagion – the blockbusters keep coming.

It’s a contrasting stance to that of her contemporaries, Juliette Binoche and Audrey Tautou.

While both fluttered with American success – Tautou in The Da Vinci Code and Binoche in Steve Carrell’s Dan in Real Life, and more recently, a four-minute appearance in Godzilla [which was largely a favour to her teenage son], they’ve remained resolutely loyal to the Gallic arts.

Fellow Oscar-winner Binoche told Weekend this summer: “I could have moved to America and had a big career there but it was never a purpose for me”.

And when we met last year, Tautou was far more scathing of the Hollywood system. “To do something else other than the ‘girlfriend’ there, it’s very difficult.”

Can Marion identify with this attitude?

“Not really,” she replies. “I’m lucky to have very interesting roles. Even being a girlfriend in a Michael Mann movie [Public Enemies], Johnny Depp’s girlfriend, was not so bad.”

Incidentally, one of Tinseltown’s biggest players rescued Marion’s career some five years before her throaty brilliance in La Vie En Rose earned her the Best Actress Oscar – the first for a French language performance.

“It was like 2002 and I started to feel kind of anxious and angry that sometimes, I would not get the big things that I wanted to get; the big directors, amazing roles. Not just in America but in France too.

“I thought I would stop, quit this job for a while.

“I had the energy to do different things. I really wanted to be active, not just waiting for my phone to ring and being happy because someone chose me.”

Cotillard glances outside the window, towards the London Eye. The hot sun bakes the grinding traffic on Victoria Embankment.

“So my agent said ‘OK, you just have to take one meeting and I know you’re going to be happy with it And if that doesn’t work, then you do what you want to do’.

“And that meeting was Tim Burton.”

The visionary director, best known for Beetlejuice and Edward Scissorhands was Marion’s idol growing up. She mirrored herself on his muse, Winona Ryder. He was interested in the young French beauty for a small part in his urban fairytale, Big Fish.

“I said, ‘OK, it’s going to be the test. If I get this one, I will not stop’. And there I was a few months later working with him. So I never stopped.”

She offered a distinctly weak handshake when we were introduced but the actress warms up as our interview progresses. Soon the unmistakeable velvet tone in her voice begins to dance and those deep slate green eyes flash.

In an airy white room in London’s Somerset House, the regal location for the premiere of her new film, Two Days, One Night, she perches on a black couch beside Weekend.

Predictably elegant in a midnight blue, embellished Dior shift dress – being one of the faces of the label – she recalls a sheltered, comfortable upbringing as the eldest of two actors turned drama teachers. Growing up in Orleans, Marion and her twin brothers, Quentin and Guillaume, were untroubled by the family’s shaky finances.

“Sometimes they had more money, sometimes they had less. But I guess they protected us in a way. We never really felt the ups and downs of the bank account. We never had a lot of money, so when we had a little less, it was not dramatic.

“I only actually experienced this when I started to live by myself, when I started acting and I was counting my coins and my bank account was, how do you say? Minus, minus…”

In her new film, crafted by Belgian auteurs, the Dardenne brothers, Cotillard is Sandra, a factory worker and mother, suffering from crippling depression. Facing redundancy after a lengthy period on sick leave, she must convince her fellow employees to forgo their bonus to save her job. It’s a cruel dilemma.

And delivering an intricate, absorbing performance, Oscar buzz is already buzzing for a portrayal of a shattered victim of France’s battered economy.

“It’s this social reality that a lot of people live today. And it asks so many questions. How do you live in a world where you feel worthless? Useless? With a society that puts you aside because you’re not good enough and you feel like you don’t have a place in this world?”

Marion’s depiction of numbing depression is stunning and as a mother herself, to three-year-old Marcel with her partner, actor and director Guillaume Canet, it had an emotional resonance.

“How can it push you to the point where you want to leave this world, because you feel useless? Because when you have kids, you are never useless. That’s what I found so interesting.”

Marion has spoken in the past about her propensity to absorb a character in method style. For Piaf, she shrank her body from its petite 5’6” frame to the tortured soul’s miniscule 4’11” stature by crippling and curling her form. She shaved her eyebrows and hairline and spoke in her gravelly voice, which she found difficult to shake months after production had wrapped.

For Sandra, Cotillard didn’t quite go to the same extremes, though the temptation was there. “I could have experienced and learned and documented so much but I didn’t.

“I learned about implications of panic attacks and the side effects of Xanax. That was it.

“I used to bury my whole self in the character but with a family, that is simply not practical.”

Cotillard met Canet while shooting drama, Love Me If You Dare. He was married to actress Diane Kruger while Marion was in a relationship with actor Stephan Guerin-Tillie. After his divorce in 2006, they reconnected and by the end of 2007, confirmed their relationship.

The French press branded them the equivalent of Brangelina. They welcomed son Marcel into the world three years ago. Family has overshadowed her previous priorities.

However, embodying classic literature’s ultimate femme fatale has pushed Cotillard’s limits.

“It’s the toughest job I’ve ever done,” she says of Lady Macbeth in Justin Kurzel’s screen adaptation of the Bard’s Scottish play. Michael Fassbender is her malleable Macbeth. “And this character was really heavy to share my life with.”

She uncrosses and crosses her legs, entering into a mournful hypnosis.

“I put a lot of pressure on myself and I couldn’t get rid of this pressure. It was the darkest role I’ve ever had. And I have played some dark characters. Actually most of the movies I do, they’re not super happy to live.

“But at least, all the characters I had, even in the darkest places, there was a light. With her, no f**king light in Lady Macbeth. The darkness was kind of hard to experience.”

Fassbender’s known for his rapscallion ways. Surely he brought some relief to set.

“I think Michael was quite affected too. And the ideas that Justin and him had, I never knew how a scene would turn out. It was interesting to see him carrying Macbeth and I think it’s going to be, for him, I cannot even find the words to describe his Macbeth. It’s going to be so strong.”

Cotillard’s publicist stealthily creeps into the room. The French star is on the clock. Her premiere beckons.

Weekend wonders if she’s doing herself a disservice with these shadowy, sorrowful characters. Her Piaf exhibited a sly comic timing. And she inexplicably appeared in a bizarre montage for Anchorman 2 last year. Isn’t it time the star pushed for a funny role and left the sadness behind?

“That’s the plan,” she cries. “I can do comedy. I did it when I started but it was not my best work.

“But something along the lines of Bridesmaids. That slapstick comedy, that’s exactly what I’m after. It’s not necessarily my area. And I would have to work hard.”

I can already spot the whurs and clinks in her intricate thought process. She’s planning her descent into the mind of a chaotic maid of honour. Studying the method behind the fart jokes and vomit gags.

“I would have to work hard,” the actress repeats, tapping her chin.

Hopefully not too hard…

Two Days, One Night is in cinemas this weekend

Marion

Marion

She’s the smart, considered, Oscar-winning actress who also happens to be our new favourite French style icon. Stylist meets the impossibly elegant Marion Cotillard

Listening to Marion Cotillard makes me want to be French. Looking at her has the same effect, but it’s listening to her that has me dreaming about booking a seat on the next Eurostar. The intonations of her voice rise and fall with the subject matter, lulling me into a relaxed state as she philosophises in English about the economy or being a humanist, every so often forgetting herself and reverting to her native tongue. Even when she becomes truly excited about the Dior dinner she will attend later that evening with her good friend, Dior creative director Raf Simons, and her voice climbs a few octaves, it is still soothing.

Stylist catches up with the 38-year-old actress between Dior’s haute couture a/w 2014 show earlier in the day (Cotillard has been the ‘face’ of Lady Dior handbags since 2008) and the ensuing celebratory dinner. She is surrounded by boxes in the apartment she shares with her partner, actor and director Guillaume Canet and their three-year-old son Marcel. It’s not just her significant other who is in the same industry: Cotillard was born in Paris to a family of actors, growing up in Orléans where she studied at the Conservatoire d’Art Dramatique. Before long she was being cast in French TV dramas but it was Luc Besson’s 1998 film Taxi that took her career up a notch. Now, after working on film sets across the globe, from Pittsburgh (The Dark Knight Rises in 2012) to the Isle of Skye (Macbeth with Michael Fassbender, due for release in 2015), she has settled back in her home country.

Cotillard’s latest film, Two Days, One Night, has critics whispering “Oscar” in relation to her performance. Directed by Belgian brothers Luc and Jean-Pierre Dardenne (who have won the coveted Cannes Film Festival Palme d’Or Award twice), she plays Sandra, a working-class woman struggling with depression who has one weekend to convince her colleagues to give up their 1,000 Euro bonuses to save her job. To be honest, I was wary of seeing a film this emotionally taxing just in its synopsis, but came away oddly uplifted. Marion is exceptional; it’s the most convincing depiction of depression I’ve seen: traumatic, yes, but with chinks of light and hope.

Bringing subtlety and nuance to every performance is Marion’s modus operandi. It’s what won her the Academy Award for best actress for her portrayal of Edith Piaf in La Vie En Rose, the 2007 film that had the world at her impeccably shod feet, and the reason she’s booked up until 2016 with another five films to be releasedafter Two Days, One Night. But before we get to her relentless schedule, I’m dying to know what she picked up from Dior earlier…

Did anything take your fancy at the Dior show?
Oh yeah, a lot of things. I’m very impressed by the way Raf reinvents his world all the time. He’s a very special person. The way he mixes his very modern vision of clothes and the Dior house is really, really impressive.

Watching Two Days, One Night was an intense experience… 
Everything was intense during shooting. The role is intense because Sandra goes through a lot and the experience itself with the Dardenne brothers, the way they wanted to shoot the movie was… oh merde, comment dit ça…? A sequence shot? A scene is just one take that keeps rolling, and sometimes we did 100 takes. I’ve never worked with such demanding directors. But I loved it. That’s what I want when I work with someone; that they will be super-demanding in a creative way.

It’s one of the most realistic portrayals of depression I’ve seen on screen. Has anyone in your life experienced it? 
Not really. But I know what it is to not feel at the right place [in life]. That’s something I experienced myself. My parents taught me how to move on when something is stuck and I have the strength not to fall, but I was very close to depression. So [with Sandra], I knew what it was to be lost and deeply in pain and not know exactly where it comes from, or how to stop or deal with it.

Luc Dardenne said they worked hard to make sure you looked ‘ordinary’ in the film. You certainly look incredibly different to how you look now. 
This is something I always do for every role. I’m very interested in what’s inside and drives a person. What is their heart and soul? Whatyou have inside shows on the outside; the way you talk and breathe. Do you look someone in the eye? Do you breathe from the lungs or your throat? The way you move tells a lot about who you are inside. A shy person walks and talks like a shy person. One of my favourite things is finding the physicality of a character. I find the performance inside and how it impacts the outside and what people can see of you.

You’ve been called “shockingly beautiful”. How does that feel?
I’m never really aware because I’m not very interested in it. I don’tneed it. Sometimes people I work with read blogs, so I see the occasional thing about myself. It makes me laugh because either way you can’t change anything. It’s not the end of the world if you look like sh*t! You know what I mean? 

You’ve said it was hard to find the right emotions to portray Sandra. What makes you feel emotional yourself?
Wow. My god. Almost everything. Kids make me emotional. I’m a very emotional person. That’s a problem for me but I deal with it by being an actress.

Another factor in the film is the economic crisis in France…
The crisis everywhere, you mean!

What’s it like to live in France right now? Does it feel like things are improving?
I only just returned to Paris. It’s funny when you take a step back. I feel there’s a kind of depression now which affects a lot of things like creativity. But I think we’re going to find the way out. You know, French people and this word ‘existentialism’… we question ourselves too much sometimes, circling on our own problems. I’m not saying we shouldn’t pay attention to them, but it wouldn’t hurt to pay attention to what happens in the rest of the world occasionally.

What is it about Paris that has drawn you back? 
I’ve been in Paris two weeks and have finally opened my boxes that were sleeping in my apartment for three years. The last time I lived here, I was pregnant [in 2011]. So I’m in this process of reconnecting with France. There is this energy of all these amazingpeople who created this country and this city. But like I said, I feel we need to open up to the world. We have to stop thinking we’re the best at everything; it’s not true first of all. I mean, it’s good to have confidence but at a certain point, you also need to learn from others. But Paris is so beautiful.

You’ve appeared in a mix of blockbuster films and low-key projects – which do you prefer?
Both. Otherwise I wouldn’t do both. I always choose a project because I feel it’s my place to be there and I love the project, even with the blockbusters. My dream when I was a kid was to be Peter Sellers; to jump from comedy to something totally different. I haven’t jumped yet into comedy but that’s one of my dreams. I find joy in opposites.

What is your favourite Peter Sellers film?
The Party. Or Docteur Folamour… I mean Dr Strangelove. The guy was a genius.

Who makes you laugh now?
Will Ferrell! My friends. I have very, very funny friends. They make me cry because I laugh so hard. Oh, and Jennifer Lawrence. Yeah, that’s a good list! 

You filmed Macbeth on the Isle of Skye in February. Was it cold?
Yes! That was crazy cold. There were hailstones, which made it harder. But hard is good.

If hard is good when you’re working, do you take it easy when you’re not?
Time off is super, super tiny in my world. But now I am off, I read and watch documentaries. I try to play music and become a good musician, which is far away but I’m getting closer. I’m going to have to be just a musician before being a good one [laughs]. Being in Paris after all those years, I’m seeing friends. It’s a marvellous thing to be able to reconnect and share everything they know and talk about the world. That’s something I missed a lot; it’s one of the things I enjoy most.

What do you talk about? The environment? Your work with Greenpeace is well-documented.
Not only Greenpeace. I support all people who want to… I wouldn’t say change the world, but to push it to a more human evolution.

Who inspires you in this way?
There are so many – it’s really reassuring to have a very long list. A lot of French people, like Pierre Rabhi or Edgar Morin. [Canadian astrophysicist] Hubert Reeves. Wangari Maathai and Aung San Suu Kyi. All people who fight for people.

Are you happy? 
Yes, I am. I have an amazing experience of life. It makes me understand more and more about the weird animal we are and it makes me happy to be connected to people and to learn.

One of Edith Piaf’s most famous songs was about not having regrets – do you have any?
Non. I know that things I didn’t do were simply things I was not meant to do. Or I wasn’t the right person or it wasn’t the right moment. Maybe I had some but then I realised regret is not a good thing to feel. I am sure you do what you need to.

What’s next? More unpacking? 
I’m very fast! I opened my boxes in 10 days. I still have a few more but they can wait. Tonight, I have a Dior dinner, which I’m looking forward to because they’re amazing, funny people. And Jennifer Lawrence will be there so I’m going to have a lot of fun! 

Will the food be good? 
But of course! We’re in Paris. The food will be magnifique!

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