Tag: Blood Ties

Marion Cotillard, Guillaume Canet: Reality Show

Translation from Madame Figaro’s “Marion Cotillard, Guillaume Canet: Reality Show”‘s article from their February 2017 issue. Photos here.

In his new film, ‘Rock n’ Roll’, the actor/director and his partner, superstar and Dior ambassador, step onto the screen with insolent self-ridicule. A mockery of the star system, which they play for us in front of Jean-Baptiste Mondino’s camera. Exclusive photoshoot.

They are an emblematic cinema duo, one of those power couples unrivaled in France. Marion Cotillard, the Oscar level superstar – the only one to have imposed herself on Hollywood -, the inhabited actress, illuminated by James Gray or Nicole Garcia, the glamorous muse – and Dior ambassador. He, Guillaume Canet, her partner, successful actor with a brilliant director career that earned him a Caesar (Tell No One, 2006). Together for nine years now, the discreet couple have managed early on to evade intrusion in their private lives. That’s no longer really the case, the celebrity of Marion Cotillard having fueled curiosities and unhealthy rumors. The couple, still going strong, resists without difficulty: a second child will see the light of day in a few weeks.

Funny and cultivating a healthy self-mockery, Marion Cotillard and Guillaume Canet decided to laugh at their peculiar life as stars. That is the subject of the irresistible ‘Rock’n’Roll’, the fifth film directed by Guillaume Canet , and which marks his return behind the cameras after the half-success of Blood Ties, tribute to the New Hollywood of the 1970s. The secret to this crazy comedy? Mixing the true, the false, and the fantasy in a game of distorting mirrors, a jubilant farce that is also a fable squeaking about the habits of show biz, ambition and youthism. We find a Guillaume Canet in full midlife crisis, ready to do whatever it takes to become a cool actor again, under the gaze of his wife, who in turn learns the Québécois accent in “studio actor” for Xavier Dolan’s film.

In an exceptional photo session staged by Mondino, the two actors revisited, in their own way, the famous bed-in by John Lennon and Yoko Ono of 1969 (the press conference that took place in their bed). It is, as is the case with Rock’n’Roll, a delicious exaggeration of the start-system. Exclusive Interview.

Madame Figaro: In Rock’n’Roll, you break the myth of the glamorous couple of French cinema. Why play with your image?
Guillaume Canet: A young journalist pointed out to me one day that my life as a fourty year old father, in a couple for a long time, was neither sexy nor ‘rock’, compared to that of the younger generation. This gave me the idea of ​​a comedy where that simple phrase triggers a disproportionate existential crisis. I push the neurotic trait that we all cultivate: the fear of aging, the desire to be seen as someone else, the need for recognition …
Marion Cotillard: When Guillaume told me about Rock’n’Roll, I thought that there was good material for very funny scenes. It was also an opportunity for us to really think about one’s image. Moreover, I was happy that Guillaume had found a topic that made him want to go behind the camera again, he is really a great director. Blood Ties, his latest film, which I adore, was harshly criticized. When your man is in trouble, you are affected in the same way. Seeing him excited about a project again moved me.
G. C.: After Blood Ties, I went through a period of doubt. I took a one year break during which I refocused: on horse shows, on family, on friends. Gradually, the joy of cinema returned. I worked on this film with great lightness, embarking all my relatives with me: my agent, my producer, my friends and, of course, my wife. I have heard so many ridiculous things about Marion and I, that I wanted to play with the image that people have of us, and also with the way we perceive ourselves.

Have you ever been hurt by a false image that people attributed to you?
M. C: After La Vie En Rose, an image of me that is very distant from what I am began to circulate. To protect myself, I retreated, which created another form of image, that of the snobish and cold girl, in which I did not recognize myself, either … People imagine us locked up in an ivory tower because they see us only during public appearances. The shift probably comes from there.
G. C: I regularly read aberrant stuff about us, for example that Marion lives in Los Angeles … People do not imagine that we live like everyone else, that we do our shopping, cooking, We take our son to school … In the film, I wanted to go from the real to the caricature, with this message: “Stop believing everything they tell you! ”
M. C.: I do not allow myself to be invaded by the negativity. I work on myself, I no longer take things personally. I learned to accept and live in the present moment. Since then, my balance is no longer conditioned by the eyes of others. It is liberating.
G. C.: I give little importance to the image that people can have of me, but I get very annoyed when some present Marion as this aloof person…
M. C.: … which I can be sometimes, but it’s not all I am! (Laughter.)
G. C.: I wanted to show Marion as I know her – with personality, funny, crazy – and this film proves it, because, as much an international star as she is, she did not refuse to do any the scenes. She possesses a sense of exceptional self-mockery.

Overexposure is the theme of this exclusive photo shoot for Madame Figaro. How do you manage the inconveniences of the media?
G. C.: We live in a time where everything we do is watched, even if it has no sense, no depth, no truth to it. At one point, I was living things viscerally. On the day of the birth of our son, for example, I was enraged when the paparazzi climbed our gate and spoiled that wonderful moment for us. Today, we learn to better preserve ourselves from all that is toxic. It was fun to convey this through this photo shoot. Today, everyone turns into a paparazzi with their cell phone. Some want to come in? Well, let them come in! That’s the whole idea of ​​my film. It’s best that we open the door ourselves, play with the fantasy and laugh with it.

It is also a cruel comedy about youth. For actors and actresses, is aging really that devastating?
G. C.: We live in a strange society that does not want to see itself grow old. Appearance takes precedence over substance. On social networks, one must give a perfect image of oneself, personality matters. Everything is fake. The fear of aging is indeed palpable in our profession because people watch us age on the screen, and it can be destabilizing. Many actors and actresses, especially in the United States, do not resist this quest for absolute youth. They all end up looking like each other, no longer having any age or expression. That bothers me more than growing old!

In cinema, do roles diminish as age increases?
M. C.: It is more complicated for the actresses, I think. Age is almost considered a disease for women, while we speak of maturity for a man. In the United States, in action movies or blockbusters, we do not see heroines in their 40s very much, those actresses are handed the role of the thinking heads that stay behind a computer … But let’s be optimistic! There will always be screenwriters who will write strong roles for women over 40 years of age. Things are changing.

There are hilarious scenes in the film, especially when Marion Cotillard starts to speak in the Québécois accent to prepare a role …
G. C.: It’s a little revenge (smiles). For the nine years we have been together, I have witnessed her involve herself without restraint in the preparation of often complex roles – what I call in the film the roles “with an accent” or ” with disabilities “. Marion should not just be a spectator of the delirium of my character, and the accent allowed her to build a funny role.
M. C.: I am always more at ease with roles that are completely far from who I am, where everything has to be built from scratch. Body language has to be set in place, a way of breathing. I want to dive body and soul into a role. It invades me, and it is not always easy to balance this invasion with my personal life. In the film, of course, Guillaume exaggerates this. It’s pretty funny. We are in a magnified reality, I am a lot less of a nut than the Marion Cotillard in the film!

What do you see in each other?
G. C.: I feel sincere admiration for Marion, which nourishes my love for her. I admire her talent, her genius as an actress, the way she gets involved and shows emotion with remarkable intelligence Beyond the actress, I love the woman she has become – serene, confident, always thinking of others – and the way she raises our son. I think she has also done a great job on me. (Smiles.) I’ve changed a lot since we’ve been together.
M. C.: I’m lucky to live with a man who evolves in magnificent ways, it’s admirable and above all inspiring. He raises me up, helps me to accept myself. We’re nourishing each other. W actors possess highly developed egos that can quickly invade the entire space if they’re not kept in check. Guillaume does not allow himself to be devoured by the “monster”. He is benevolent and has a huge heart that makes everybody around him feel happy

What makes your couple strong after nine years?
M. C.: When we met, fourteen years ago, we began by being friends before being a couple. That is our strength. We always have so much fun together. We are partners in the true sense of the word. He is my best friend and the love of my life.

You will soon be parents to a second child. In what state of mind are you?
M. C.:I am anxious to give myself time and to live the moment fully. During my pregnancy, I had to promote five films – the agenda made it so… It’s time to refocus on the essential!

Rock’n’Roll, directed by Guillaume Canet. In theaters February 15.

‘Blood Ties’ UK Trailer

‘Blood Ties’ UK Trailer

Marion Cotillard Flirts With the Dark Side

Marion Cotillard Flirts With the Dark Side

The French actress on her role choices, learning Polish and love scenes with Johnny Depp.

In “The Immigrant,” a drama set in 1921, French actress Marion Cotillard plays a Polish woman who lands at Ellis Island, then immediately falls into a dangerous limbo of indigence and prostitution.

It’s a characteristically intense role for the 38-year-old actress, who won an Oscar for her portrayal of the gifted but doomed singer Edith Piaf in 2007’s “La Vie en Rose.” That film accelerated a career already humming in France, and the newly minted Hollywood star didn’t retreat from the wounded characters that were her specialty. In the Batman blockbuster “The Dark Knight Rises,” she played a villain hiding in plain sight. In “Rust and Bone,” her character lost her legs to a killer whale she trained. In last year’s “Blood Ties,” directed by her boyfriend, Guillaume Canet, her character sells her body to keep her family afloat. Releases on the way include Australian director Justin Kurzel’s “Macbeth” (as the famously tormented wife of Michael Fassbender’s tragic hero). In the French “Two Days, One Night,” competing at the Cannes Film Festival this month and directed by brothers Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne, Ms. Cotillard plays a worker who has a weekend to convince colleagues to forego bonuses so she can keep her job.

Set for release May 16, “The Immigrant” was directed and co-written by James Gray, who has worked with Ms. Cotillard’s co-star, Joaquin Phoenix, on several films. Here he plays Bruno, a New Yorker who swoops in on Ms. Cotillard’s Ewa after her sister is quarantined on Ellis Island. Jeremy Renner stars as a magician and potential ally to Ewa. In a recent interview in lower Manhattan, not far from where the period drama is set, Ms. Cotillard sat in a chair with her bare feet tucked under her. The pair of high heels next to her matched her navy blue dress. She discussed heavy characters, learning Polish and love scenes. Edited from an interview:

Even though she’s educated and speaks English, your character, Ewa, is reduced to nothing when she arrives in the U.S.

She didn’t have to use English when she was in Poland in order to survive, as she does in New York. The way you express yourself in a language that is not yours makes you different. That was a thing that I could relate to. When you don’t have the freedom to express yourself with all the words and the subtleties of the language, you don’t feel the same. I remember when I first came [to the U.S.] and I started to work, I felt sometimes like a little girl because I didn’t know to express myself exactly as I wanted to.

You only had about a month to learn your Polish dialogue?

Two months. First of all, I never have enough time when I work on a language or an accent. But when you know you don’t have enough time, you stop thinking. You just work as much as you can, and that is okay when you have to shoot the scene.

After preparing on your own for a role, how do you adjust to another actor, such as Joaquin Phoenix, who has prepared for the same production in his own way?

Even though we didn’t have enough time, because it was a very low budget, we had the chance to rehearse for two weeks. And Joaquin needs to understand everything, deeply, so he needs to talk a lot.

What did you talk about?

They are very complex characters, the three of them, including Jeremy Renner’s character. She has the ability to see good things in each person, even the darkest person, like Bruno. He’s making those women do things that they might not want to do, so he is evil. But at the same time he respects those women in his own way, and he loves them. They need each other more than they think. That’s what we talked about, their relationship. Because they don’t talk that much to each other. They don’t have a big scene where they open their hearts. At a certain point in the movie, it’s almost like an old couple, who have never really spoken and will never really speak. They just need each other, and they start to respect each other.

There’s a deep pain in many of the characters you play. Is that what draws you to those roles?

It’s not a conscious decision, but I have done a lot of painful characters. I love when you can explore the bright and the dark side at the same time. And I think it’s where I can understand the human soul.

Why did you wince when I asked that question?

Lately, all the characters I have lived with were heavy. When I decided to do Lady Macbeth, for example, my boyfriend laughed at me. He was like, “God, how far do you want to go into pain?” I don’t really know. Each role I take, I feel it was meant to be. The Dardenne brothers’ movie made sense, because I’d had a deep questioning about a similar subject: In France, there was a company where people started to kill themselves, and one of them left a letter about feeling useless.

In your last two films you play a prostitute.

It’s about how a woman survives in a tough world when she has to survive for someone else. In “The Immigrant,” her sister is more important than her. In “Blood Ties,” she uses her body to feed her kids. That’s what’s left when there is nothing left.

Did you talk to James Gray about how those scenes would be shot and how far they would go?

That was clear in the script. What she goes through in terms of humiliation, you can see it without seeing flesh. It would have been too much. We have a word for that in French: “miserablisme.” Sometimes you don’t need to push the horror too far to feel it.

Is a disturbing sex scene harder to shoot than a romantic sex scene?

It depends. I was always so reluctant to shoot love scenes. On those days, I’m not very friendly. I want it to be done and then start the movie again. But in “Rust and Bone,” we had very naked love scenes, and it was totally different. I was very happy. Not because [co-star] Matthias Schoenaerts is superhot, absolutely not, because I had experience with Johnny Depp before [in 2009’s “Public Enemies”] and it was also really hard for me. I was just very happy for my character. The whole day I was naked on set and I was totally fine with it.

Does the exploration of the soul sometimes feel at odds being on the cover of magazines that describe you with phrases like “classic Hollywood beauty”?

It’s part of the job and now I find pleasure in doing it. You have to find your comfort zone in a world that is not acting, but is still part of acting.

“The Immigrant” is apparently the first period film to be shot on Ellis Island. Was it your first visit?

Yes. We spent I think three nights there. It was very special because a lot of people in the extras and on the film crew had stories to share about their family members who went through. There are gigantic pictures on the walls of people, immigrants trying to look their best, and with this fear and hope in their eyes. I had family members come here later, but through San Francisco.

You mentioned the movie’s tight budget. Did you ever look around on set and wonder if it would feel real on screen?

No. The question I have in mind is how can we shoot everything in a short amount of time. Which is impossible. We worked crazy hours. I didn’t sleep for two months. One day on set I felt something was wrong with James, and he said, “I won’t be able to make this scene in my mind a reality because I don’t have time to shoot it the right way.” I didn’t like that. On the last movie I did, “Macbeth,” the first question I asked the director was, “How will you shoot a period movie, with battles, in eight weeks?” This is insane. He had to cut scenes out.

Do you feel like you’re maintaining two careers at once, one in France and one in the U.S.?

The question is not about doing movies in two different places, the question is doing movies with different directors. There’s as much difference between the Dardenne brothers and Jacques Audiard as Woody Allen and Michael Mann.

‘Blood Ties’ was released in US

‘Blood Ties’ was released in US

‘Blood Ties’ was released in the US last month on March 21. Check out the official site to find a theater near you that plays the movie. It is also available on US iTunes, Amazon Instant Video and Movies On Demand.

The movie was released on DVD and Blu-ray in France last Wednesday. I will add screencaptures soon. In the meantime I added the missing French full-length trailer, various Making Ofs featuring Marion Cotillard, the US trailer as well as a movie clip. There are also two interviews with Marion Cotillard about the movie and new artwork. Enjoy.

Gallery:
001 Blood Ties – 2013 > On Set
008 Blood Ties – 2013 > Artwork
023 Online Interviews > EmpireOnline.com – 2013
122 Online Interviews > RTBF.be – 2013

Video:
006 Movie & TV – 2013: Blood Ties
002 Interviews – Online Interviews

‘Blood Ties’ – EmpireOnline

‘Blood Ties’ – EmpireOnline

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