Publication: Vogue

Marion Cotillard Talks Rust And Bone

Marion Cotillard Talks Rust And Bone

FOR most people, playing a young woman who has her legs amputated isn’t the easiest of film roles to take on, but Marion Cotillard says that she had the perfect distraction from the intensity of her Rust and Bone character.

“I was a new mum when we were filming – my son was five months old – and he needed me,” she told us. “I wanted to spend time with him and put him to bed. He wasn’t sleeping through the night at that stage. I honestly think I reached the point of exhaustion while I was making that film.”

But, in fact, her newborn was an asset to Cotillard in helping her get into her role of Stéphanie – a whale-trainer who endures a tragic accident.

“I was so tired-looking and drained that when I arrived on set I didn’t need any make-up to make me look ill and miserable,” she said. “The make-up artist would just look at me and say: ‘I think you’re good to go.’ It sounds horrible, but I loved that character so much. It was very easy to get into the physical state that she was in. If anything, it was quite exciting.”

The Oscar-winning actress was drawn to the film because of its “unusual and unconventional script” and because of its director, French-born Jacques Audiard, who also created BAFTA-winning film The Beat That My Heart Skipped.

“It was always a dream of mine to work with him,” she said. “And you don’t get that many female characters written in so much depth and who feel so powerful. I fell in love with the whole package.”

She hopes that the film challenges traditional perceptions of disability.

“I can’t tell you hard it was to try and show what it is to wake to find out your legs just aren’t there anymore,” she said. “The strength it must take to decide that you can’t be sad forever and life can be beautiful again – it’s almost unimaginable.”

Rust and Bone is available on DVD now.

Marion Cotillard BAFTA Interview Exclusive

Marion Cotillard BAFTA Interview Exclusive

from Vogue.com / by Ella Alexander​

MARION COTILLARD’s BAFTA red carpet look took just an hour and a half to create. The French star, who was nominated for Best Leading Actress for Rust and Bone, wore a Dior canary yellow gown.

“Any longer than that I get bored,” she told us ahead of last night’s event. “It’s all very simple. My team puts forward a selection of dresses and I choose the one I feel most natural in. When I first saw the dress at the Dior show, I didn’t fall in love with it straight away. It was when I saw it up close, that colour, its edgy side – it’s a piece of art.”

Cotillard has long been an ambassador for Dior – she is currently the face of its Lady Dior campaign and is soon to design a bag for the label. Having worked with the brand during John Galliano’s tenure and now under Raf Simons’ creative direction, she is impressed by how Dior’s new helmer is developing the label.

“It’s the hardest thing to arrive at a fashion house after such a brilliant and inventive designer,” she said. “I’m honestly amazed by what he’s done there, how he’s found his personality and injected that into the clothes. It’s so admirable. It could have taken him a lot longer to get to where he already has. I’ve met him a few times and he has such a creative spirit. He uses such beautiful materials and I love the architecture of his designs. He’s an amazing choice for Dior.”

That’s not to say that she isn’t looking forward to welcoming Galliano back to fashion. The designer is currently completing a temporary residency at Oscar de la Renta’s studio in New York.

“I am super excited about it,” she said. “I really respect John as an artist. It’s hard to explain and forgive him for what he did and said, but things happen for a reason. He wasn’t well. I’m so happy he’s back. The man is a genius.”

Despite her strong loyalties to Dior, Cotillard isn’t immune to the charms of other luxury brands.

“I’d love to work with Gaultier and I’m obsessed with Vivienne Westwood,” she said. “I met her very briefly at an event in November. I saw at the beginning of the night and then, right at the end, I thought, ‘I cannot leave without telling her how much I love her.’ So I jumped on her, told her that I adore her work. She was very nice about it all.”