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26
Nov 2012
English Press  •  By  •  0 Comments

from USA Today / by Donna Freydkin

Mere weeks after giving birth to son Marcel last May, Marion Cotillard shot a Dior ad — and proved that biology and enviable genes do trump all. She seemed to have dropped any pregnancy pounds literally overnight.

“I lost a lot of weight right away. It sounds really good but it was really violent on my body. It happened in six days. I lost almost everything. I was happy but on the other hand, it was really violent,” confirms Cotillard. “I didn’t do a special diet. It just happened. My mum was the same. She was skinnier after the baby than before.”

Cotillard is devoted to her son and his dad and her longtime partner, director/actor Guillaume Canet.

And yes, even celebrity moms deal with the onset of the terrible twos and other trials and tribulations of raising a kid. “Sometimes it’s insane but it’s surrounded by love so it’s kind of easy, even though it’s tiring,” she says.

In Rust and Bone, she plays a double amputee who loses her legs in a freak accident. So we had to ask her: How do you play a character like that and not take her home with you?

“Because when I stop working, I’m not just with myself. People need me. It’s a good thing. But still on set, I hope I was 100 percent with the story and my character and the director and the actors. I don’t know exactly how to explain it,” says Cotillard. “I just couldn’t take care of only me. You do what you have to do.”

26
Nov 2012
Fans, Gallery Updates, Movies  •  By  •  0 Comments

Rust and Bone‘ opened in New York last Friday. This brought new and/or better pictures of the movie. Enjoy!

Also, Marion Cotillard is expected today for the IFP Gotham Awards where she will receive a career tribute. Also the pre-recorded interview on Chelsea Lately Show will air later today!

Gallery:
004 De rouille et d’os (Rust and Bone) – 2012 > Stills
001 De rouille et d’os (Rust and Bone) – 2012 > On Set
002 Portraits > Sessions from 2012 > ‘Rust and Bone’ Promo

25
Nov 2012
Gallery Updates, Other Work, Video updates  •  By  •  0 Comments

‘Grand Public’ a, I think new, show that brings in-depth reports about all things culture on French TV channel France 2 aired a segment about Marion Cotillard in Barcelona last Thursday night. I added the clip as well as HQ screencaptures on Friday but forgot to post about it.

They showed how big the anticipation was in Barcelona by showing news clippings and posters for the show. However, the people in charge are cited who say that they didn’t want a lot of mediazation or attention so they were happy it only started in the few days before the show. The report included some footage of Marion and the other performers getting ready before the show.

The report later laid out how important this role was to Marion, how close to her heart. After having been handed the show by her mother, so to speak, in 2005 (they included a few seconds of footage with her mother as Joan of arc) she wanted to reprise it again. So when the people in Barcelona were organizing their celebration of the 600th anniversary of Joan of Arc’s birth and wanted to include Honegger’s oratorio but were lacking a main actress then heard that Marion was interested they jumped at the chance. Apparently, there really doesn’t exist any footage of Marion in the play back in 2005 as they only showed stills and had a reporter recall how it was. He said that she was exceptional and that it showed what she could do. If she could do Joan of Arc in this then she could do Edith Piaf. Which she, as we all know, did. Now, a Hollywood star she’s still capable of doing it.

Another reporter said that it’s a challenging part, when you do it right it can be the highlight of your career but when you mess it up it can be the worst experience ever, even put you out of business.

So seeing again the overwhelming approval of the audience by their (10 min) long applause and seeing an emotional and overwhelmed but satisfied Marion backstage after the show, hugging the producer and talking to the press was quite moving to watch.

I have some more articles & TV reports about this but have to get it ready (in English) first.

Gallery: 172 Specials > Grand Public (France 2) – 22/11/2012
Video: 001 Documentaries > Grand Public

21
Nov 2012
Gallery Updates, Video updates  •  By  •  2 Comments

I added the video and HD screencaptures of Marion’s appearance on The Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson last night – though it was recorded 2 weeks ago on December 6. It was as funny as those Ferguson interviews get, Marion was at ease and played along with his jokes and was goofing around. It’s really entertaining to watch – though actual content-wise there’s nothing new. Oh, and she looked really chic in that outfit and the bright red lipstick.

Gallery: 371 Talk Shows > The Late Late Show With Craig Ferguson – 2012
Video: 001 Talk Shows > Craig Ferguson

21
Nov 2012
English Press  •  By  •  0 Comments

from Deadline (US) / by David Mermelstein

Although Marion Cotillard is the perfect blend of European elegance and natural allure, she’s never been afraid to portray characters lacking those qualities. Her Oscar-winning role as chanteuse Edith Piaf in La Vie en Rose (2007) is a perfect example. But she’s also appeared in big-budget Hollywood films like Michael Mann’s Public Enemies (2009), Christopher Nolan’s Inception (2010), and, earlier this year, Nolan’s The Dark Knight Rises. Her latest role, as Stéphanie in Jacques Audiard’s French-language Rust And Bone, finds her playing an emotionally repressed whale trainer who loses her legs in an on-the-job accident and then must recalibrate her life.

AwardsLine: What attracted you to the role of Stéphanie in Rust and Bone?
Marion Cotillard:
First of all, I always wanted to work with Jacques Audiard, so I was thrilled when he asked to meet with me. I expected a very special story from him because all his movies are very special, but what I didn’t expect was a real love story. And I fell in love with the character — the evolution of her, the complexity. And how she goes from anger to power is something that really moved me.

AwardsLine: What was it like working with Audiard?
Cotillard:
It was one of the most interesting experiences I’ve had with a director. He doesn’t come on set with something very specific; it’s an exploration every day. He’s always seeking authenticity. We would try a scene many ways, but even when a take was totally different, the direction would always point the same way. And the take we finally chose was enriched by all the exploration around it.

AwardsLine: You were incredible — both emotionally and physically — in the scenes after Stéphanie lost her legs. How did you prepare for that?
Cotillard:
Physically, I started to watch videos of amputees. But very quickly I realized I didn’t need it. Because it just happened in her life, so I would live it with her. Emotionally, I saw it like someone who was struggling with life, like an empty shell, as someone who doesn’t know what to do with herself. And then there’s this dramatic accident. I saw it like a rebirth.

AwardsLine: And what about technically — what did you have to do?
Cotillard:
When I’m in the wheelchair, my legs were folded underneath me. For the scenes when I walk or am carried, I wore green socks and the rest was CGI. (Costar) Matthias Schoenaerts had to carry me in a very special way, because your center is different without legs. Also, I had to put my legs in certain positions so they could erase them easily, especially in the love scenes with Matthias and when he carries me to the sea. But that’s what we do: We try to make-believe things — first to ourselves and then to the audience. That’s acting.

AwardsLine: Did CGI make your job any easier?
Cotillard:
Jacques always says he wouldn’t have been able to do this movie even 10 or 15 years ago, because the evolution of the CGI was not where we are now. Those CGI guys were really amazing.

AwardsLine: Was it strange for you to watch the film?
Cotillard:
Yeah, it was. It’s always weird to talk about my impressions or feelings about a movie that I’m in. But I thought, This film looks amazing.

AwardsLine: What’s the primary difference between making French movies versus American movies?
Cotillard:
There’s a lot of technical differences. But the thing is, there’s as much difference between two French movies or two America movies — because every story is different, every director is different.

AwardsLine: You won the Oscar in 2008 for La Vie en Rose. How has that affected your career both internationally and in America?
Cotillard:
It opened the doors of American cinema to me. I had never dreamt of doing American movies, although I didn’t know whether it was impossible or possible. So that changed things. American projects came my way, and amazing directors wanted to work with me.

AwardsLine: Did you speak English before you started working in America?
Cotillard:
I did, but my English was very poor. My English really improved for Michael Mann’s Public Enemies, because I worked on it every day for six months.

AwardsLine: You’ve starred in some big Hollywood pictures. What’s their appeal for you?
Cotillard:
Sometimes when I meet the directors of very big blockbusters, I feel that for them making a movie is not a question of life and death — there’s not a deep need to be creative. Christopher Nolan is not part of that world. He is a real artist. So it’s a very big difference. And Michael Mann is a genius.

AwardsLine: Do you get different things as an actor from bigger versus smaller films, or do you find that acting is acting, regardless of budget?
Cotillard:
Oh, yeah, it’s exactly the same process. Each experience is unique. But my commitment to a project is the same regardless.